Projects

Ty Hapus 2015

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April 2015 saw Patrick Jones returning to Ty Hapus, Barry, to lead a series of workshops focusing on Musical Memories’. Ty Hapus Alzheimer Society is a unique initiative set up to provide care and support for those living with early on-set Dementia: it’s a safe and quiet space where those with dementia and their families can enjoy to have a cup of tea and a chat, play board games, read newspapers, or visit the ‘beauty salon’ and get their hair and nails done. Ty Hapus also organise and offer activities to their visitors.

‘Musical Memories’ followed on from 2014 poetry sessions with Patrick. This time there was a focus on favourite songs and bands: including a shared love for The Beatles and Motown, as well as stories of going to all sorts of music concerts.

Six participants along with their families and support workers at Ty Hapus developed a series of poems, one of which – ‘In My Pocket’ – will be put to music.

IN MY POCKET

In my pocket

is a piece of coal.

I hold it tight,

I see the coal fire,

my father making it up before work,

giving us heat and light.

In my pocket

is the strike of 1984,

this was our civil war,

my mam with a pram

full of coal,

pushing up our street

to warm our tired souls.

In my pocket,

the sound of the coal tipping,

Barry Docks

held in my mind

like a newspaper clipping.

In my pocket

is the best ever toast

butter dripping

its the simple things we remember the most

IN MY POCKET

MY MEMORIES ARE STILL ALIVE

IN MY POCKET

NOT READY TO SAY GOODBYE

IN MY POCKET

COME, WALK WITH ME SIDE BY SIDE

And in my pocket

is The Beatles’ ‘She loves you’

playing at my Nanna’s on the radiogram in Splott,

where she’d give you all that’s she’s got

‘she loves you’ so true.

In my pocket,

my memory is dancing

All night in Wigan

or at The New Moon Club The Hayes,

girls drinking Newcastle Brown Ale,

and in our pockets,

the trip to Barry Island

seemed like a million miles away,

seemed like the sun shone like diamonds.

I remember how the mothers

would make a circle with their deckchairs,

and all the kids would play safely there,

and we could either have Rock or Candyfloss

before we left,

MMMM I can still smell that salty air.

In my pocket

I carry them carefully

the ghost train, log flume,

banana boats,

pop and crisps at The Mermaid Hotel.

When I get lonely,

the sadness it dispels.

I see them all now,

all the people and places like silk next to skin.

In my pocket

waiting for my dad’s ship to come in

IN MY POCKET

MY MEMORIES ARE STILL ALIVE

IN MY POCKET

NOT READY TO SAY GOODBYE

IN MY POCKET

COME, WALK WITH ME SIDE BY SIDE

By Annie, Lynne, Julia, Alison and Michael

A BELL RINGS

Makes me think of Dr Cameron- sunday night – watching TV,

the end of playtime – back to sums,

the sound of school,

a sad but happy sound.

It reminds me of Uncle Keith.

He was ill and was sleeping downstairs

and used to ring a bell if he needed

anything

and used to wind us up with his bell!

The sound reminds me of

the Ice Cream Van in Porth,

and as I had 4 brothers

I had to run fast to get there first

threepence each.

Happy times

listening out for those ice cream chimes!

It could be church

or being naughty in school

or

London bells ringing

oranges and lemons say the bells of Saint Clements.

Like a school clock

or

Chris,

does it remind you of Barry Docks?

CHRISTMAS MEMORIES

Cold snow smog,

Abercwmboi or London,

a memory or a dream?

The best ever present from Grandad,

a homemade Dalek

brought on top of his car.

Boy if you could have seen my face beam.

Christmas time.

We had 8 children,

my mum cooked

gave us the best she could,

she was one in a billion.

My father took us

to Carrefour in a van,

massive foodshop but it would all disappear

before the holidays even began.

A favourite present was a pair of earrings.

My Dad was a merchant seaman

and had three daughters.

He would come home back from Japan

and the best present ever

walking dolls as tall as us

a memory that’ll stay forever.

Christmas meant monopoly.

We always knew the big day was near,

the club was closed

so my dad would bring

Flagons of Brains beer,

and we’d bring the kitchen table

into the dining room

and play monopoly, (oh dear….what doom),

how I tried to

file for bankruptcy it went on and on,

long after the snow had gone.

Best ever present a red and white bobble hat,

my mam had knitted it with lov,e such an endeavour

and I,

I wore it forever

WORDS

The smell of the chippy

as kids,

gravy,

happy memories.

The smell of my garden

in Summer

with the children.

Always loved the smell of perfume,

Chanel,

when I worked for British Coal.

The smell of a new baby-

pure

like a fresh start

PLACES

Solva, I grew up there.

I remember the beach going crabbing in the rockpools

A special place for me

was Port Talbot.

I worked there for British Coal,

had a marvelous time,

until Margaret Thatcher came along!

My beach hut off the Isle of Wight,

with the children playing on the beach,

happy memories,

going to France for our holidays

drinking wine driving and eating bread and cheese

lovely times

TO STAND and STARE

(after listening to Leisure by W H DAVIES)

To watch the birds

fascinating as they

are so small

gathering their nuts and

twigs for their nests

it is as if they are

looking

and thinking

“Mm, I’ll have that one”.

I like to sit down

and wait.

Love the garden too

full of things to see.

Love to watch the water crashing on rocks

craggy shorelines

wild weather.

The sea,

calm,

gently rippling.